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Sep 30, 2014
Sep 30, 2014

IX Disainiööl kollektsiooni Telk 2 esitlenud Kairi Lentsius oma kollektsioonist. Punase mütsiga fotograaf on Getter Kuusmaa. 

Sep 23, 2014 / 280 notes

mymodernmet:

Berlin-based photographer Olaf Heine's Brazil is a collection of intimate, black-and-white photos that highlight the multifaceted charms of the South American country. Published in a hardcover photo book by teNeues, Heine’s atmospheric images take the viewer on a whirlwind, visual journey that follows the photographer’s own fascination with Brazil.

Sep 22, 2014 / 377 notes

kateoplis:

If the newest, last stretch of the High Line doesn’t make you fall in love with New York all over again, I really don’t know what to say. Phase 3 of the elevated park, which opens on Sunday, is a heartbreaker, swinging west on 30th Street from 10th Avenue toward the Hudson River, straight into drop-dead sunset views. It spills into a feral grove of big-tooth aspen trees on 34th Street.

It’s hard to believe now that some New Yorkers once thought renovating the decrepit elevated rail line was a lousy idea. Not since Central Park opened in 1857 has a park reshaped New Yorkers’ thinking about public space and the city more profoundly. Like Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim museum in Spain, it has spread a dream, albeit largely a pipe dream, around the world: how one exceptional design — in this case, a work of landscape architecture — might miraculously alter a whole neighborhood, even a whole city’s fortunes.

Yes, at roughly $35 million, Phase 3, like the rest of the High Line, cost more per acre than probably any park in human history. With most city parks struggling to make ends meet, that kind of money is an inevitable source of resentment, notwithstanding that the High Line was, in significant measure, constructed and is almost exclusively maintained with private funds.”

But this third phase completes a kind of narrative, which the two earlier phases started, about 21st-century New York as a greener, sleeker metropolis, riven by wealth, with an anxious eye in the rearview mirror. It is a Rorschach test, signifying different things — about urban renewal, industry, gentrification, the environment — to different people. Occupying an in-between sort of space between buildings, neighborhoods, street and sky, the park makes a convenient receptacle for meaning. Neither an authentic ruin nor entirely built from scratch, a sign of runaway capital but also common ground, it is a modern landmark capitalizing on the romance of a bygone New York — the “real,” gritty city — a park born of the very forces that swept that city away.”

Photos: NG

(via seeinglandscapes)

Sep 22, 2014 / 1,620 notes
Sep 22, 2014 / 596,772 notes

(via sofis-welt)

woodendreams:

Stanton Moor, Peak District, UK (by James Mills / 500px)

Unenäos
Sep 22, 2014 / 5,505 notes

woodendreams:

Stanton Moor, Peak District, UK (by James Mills / 500px)

Unenäos

(via seeinglandscapes)

Sep 20, 2014
Sep 20, 2014
Sep 15, 2014 / 6,228 notes

lorettabosence:

Scott Outdoor Amphitheatre, Swarthmore College, PA. Designed by Thomas Sears and completed in 1942. 

2ft high retaining walls are made from layers of local schist slabs and the randomly spaced trees are Liriodendron tulipifera (Tulip Tree) and Quercus alba (White Oak).

I love the idea of a ‘turf proscenium floor’ and it looks like a great place to learn. I can imagine this kind of space would conform to the theories of design laid out in ‘A Pattern Language’ by Christopher Alexander…

http://tclf.org/landscapes/scott-outdoor-amphitheater

(via landscape-a-design)

landscape-architecture-design:

Bird’s eve view of Inman Railroad Yard in Atlanta, GA 
[x]

Raudtee-kangas
Sep 14, 2014 / 488 notes

landscape-architecture-design:

Bird’s eve view of Inman Railroad Yard in Atlanta, GA 

[x]

Raudtee-kangas

Sep 14, 2014 / 340 notes

Aprilli Design Studio’s Urban SkyFarm is a living machine, helping improve environmental quality by filtering water & air, providing edible greens & producing renewable energy. Dense urban developments will benefit from the additional green space by feeling a reduction in heat accumulation, storm water runoff & carbon dioxide. As a net zero facility, its aim is to operate only with renewable solar & wind energy. Harvesting from hydroponic systems, vertical gardens & farming decks, all goods are processed & distributed directly on the farm!

The Urban SkyFarm is a vertical solution that utilizes hydroponic systems as substitution of soil-based agricultural extensions. By using the hydroponic system, the Urban Skyfarm can provide hundreds of light weight farming decks which can be conditioned with supplementary heating, lighting and moisturizing while having the natural light as the main resource.

In order to gain maximum exposure to sunlight, the vertical garden lifts the main outdoor vegetation area higher up in the air in a section known as the “leaf” where mostly medium-based hydroponic fruit trees and larger scale vegetables needing more exposure to outside air and sunlight can be produced. The lower portions are controlled indoor environments using solution-based hydroponic farming with artificial lighting which are more suitable for indoor products such as basil, arugula, bok choy, etc..

It also serves as a community garden hub where urban dwellers can easily visit, grow their own vegetations and participate in the final production by bringing it home or selling it to the community. The central food market will host local mobile farmer markets around the neighborhood which will circulate through the city to facilitate producing and trading local food products grown by the community.

SOURCE

(via landscape-a-design)